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Mainland Affairs Council

Cross-strait cultural and educational exchanges

I. Information Services for Cross-Strait Stationed Journalists

Introduction

The two sides across the Strait share a common language and culture, yet historical, political, and value factors have created a wide gap in understanding and communication between the two sides. Having seen major evolvement over the past years such as the opening up of family visits across the Strait, holding of the Koo-Wang Summit, establishing of the Three Direct Links, and allowing for Mainland tourists and students to Taiwan, the lives of people across the Strait have changed drastically. Journalists and reporters have played a significant role in the evolving process by drawing the public’s attention to these issues. As a result of democratization, Taiwan now fully enjoys the freedoms of speech and press guaranteed by the Constitution, and with the expansion of cross-strait media exchanges, the two sides now have access to each other’s news information through various channels; however, with such established exchange channels, there is still an imbalance in the flow of news information across the Strait. In Taiwan, we receive a free flow of news information concerning Mainland China through various media channels, and yet, there are great restrictions on the Mainland China side where they have only limited access to Taiwanese news, therefore denying the Chinese people full understanding of Taiwan’s diverse and abundant culture and values. We strongly hope that the Mainland China side can acknowledge the importance of reciprocal and free flow of information across the Strait, and lift its bars concerning Taiwan-related information so as to better mutual understanding between people of the two sides. 

In order for stationed journalists on each other’s sides to fully grasp related news information, the MAC has set up a webpage providing “Information Services for Cross-Strait Stationed Journalists”, on which information such as relevant regulations, application procedures, news coverage and daily affairs are included. It is hoped that the website may assist stationed journalists’ in their dedications, and that through their first-hand reports, the people of the two sides will have better understanding of each other, respect one another’s diverse values, and thus further facilitate benign development across the Strait.

Important Information – Government Measures concerning Cross-Strait Media Exchange

A. Opening-up of stationed Mainland journalists to Taiwan in 2000: With the goal of enhancing cross-strait media exchange, the government announced the opening-up of stationed Mainland journalists to Taiwan (on a rotation duration of one month per stay) in 2000 year-end so as to allow Mainland journalists a longer duration of stay to more thoroughly and truthfully observe and report on Taiwanese society.

B. Opening-up measures as of June 30, 2008: The government increased the duration of stay for Mainland stationed journalists in Taiwan from one month to six months; streamlined their entry application procedures; and further opened-up for five more Mainland local medias to be stationed in Taiwan. 

C. Opening-up measures as of October 27, 2009: The number of journalists per media agency was increased from two to five; eliminated advance notification requirements for Mainland stationed journalists to interview outside of their jurisdictions; and agreed to allow Mainland journalists’ housing rentals in Taiwan through their inviting agencies as deemed necessary. 

D. Opening-up measures as of August 1, 2013: Mainland Chinese mass communication professionals (including Mainland journalists stationed in Taiwan) may be granted a multiple entry/exit permit within a one year period, as deemed necessary by the competent authority (Ministry of Culture), so as to give them more convenience in the course of their work. 

E. Opening-up measures as of January 1, 2014: According to stipulations stated in Section 1, Article 37 of the Rules Governing Permits for People in Mainland China Entering Taiwan, Chinese people applying for entry into Taiwan for professional exchange purposes (including Mainland journalists stationed in Taiwan) may also simultaneously apply for their spouse and minor children’s entry into Taiwan. 

F. Stationed media: There are currently ten Chinese media stationed in Taiwan, those of which including XinHua News Agency(中國大陸新華社), People’s Daily(人民日報), China National Radio(中央人民廣播電臺), China Central Television(中央電視臺), China News Service(中國新聞社), Southeast Television(福建東南衛視), Fujian News Group(福建日報社), Xiamen Star(廈門衛視), Shenzhen Press Group(深圳報業集團), and Hunan Television(湖南電視臺).

Regulations Related to Mainland Chinese Journalists Stationed in Taiwan

1. Directions for Mainland Journalists’ Practice in Taiwan

2. Rules Governing Permits for People in the Mainland Area Entering the Taiwan Area

Notices for Entry 

1. Must be in accordance with: Rules Governing Permits for People in the Mainland Area Entering the Taiwan Area

2. Type of activity: stationed services 

3. Documents required: application form, ID copies, photographs, etc. (Application must be filed online through the inviting agencies. Please visit the National Immigration Agency (NIA) website for details)

4. Duration of stay: Maximum of three months per stay, but the stay may be extended once (three months tops) if necessary; total duration of stay per year must not exceed six months

5. Processing period: five working days after submission of application (under the condition that no special circumstances occur or no additional documents are required) 

6. Permit fees: 

a. A fee of NT600 will be required per single or multiple entry/exit permit 

b. A fee of NT1000 will be required for multiple entry/exit permits within a two year period

7. Extension of duration of stay in Taiwan: documents such as extension application forms, entry/exit permit should be submitted in paper, five days prior the expiration date, from the inviting agency to the NIA (please visit the NIA website for details).

Notices for news practice and daily life in Taiwan

1. Directions for Mainland Journalists’ Practice in Taiwan

2. Accommodation: housing rentals made through the inviting agency are available to stationed journalists

3. Opening of bank accounts: stationed journalists must first apply for an ROC Uniform ID Number with the NIA; with the acquired Uniform ID Number and legal visitor documents, stationed journalists may open a personal bank account. 

4. Application of accompanying persons: stationed journalists may also simultaneously apply for their spouse and minor children to visit Taiwan 

5. Application of cellphone number: stationed journalists may purchase a prepaid SIM card at any telecommunication stores upon provision of passports and visiting documents (two IDs) 

Relevant contact windows

1. Competent authority: Cross-Strait Exchange Section of the Cultural Exchange Department, Ministry of Culture (Tel: 02-85126000, ext. 6739 or 6741) 

2. Department of Information and Liaison, Mainland Affairs Council (Tel: 02-23975589, ext.7004 or 7031)

3. Straits Exchange Foundation 24-hour emergency hotline: 02-25339995

Links on Living and Reporting in Taiwan

1.Overview

2.Annual events

3.Cultural and creative development

4.Bureau of Culture in Counties and Cities

5.National human rights museums

6. Weather forecasts

7.Public Transportation: Taipei Rapid Transit Corporation; New Taipei Metro Corporation; Taoyuan Metro Corporation; Kaohsiung Rapid Transit Corporation; Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation; and Taiwan Railway Administration, Ministry of Transportation and Communications

8.Taiwan national parks

9.Executive Yuan clarifications on news reports

Taiwanese journalists stationed in the Mainland Area 

Notices for interview application

1. Application window: Taiwanese journalists to be stationed in Beijing of the Mainland must apply to the State Council’s Taiwan Affairs Office (TAO), and those to be stationed in other areas of the Mainland must apply to respective local Taiwan Affairs Offices of the provinces, autonomous regions, and directly controlled municipalities. Taiwanese journalists to be stationed in the Mainland must first acquire approval documents from the Mainland to conduct news interviews in the Area, with which may be used to obtain entry permits into the Mainland. 

2. Required documents: application form for Taiwanese journalists to interview in Mainland China 

3. Duration of stay: maximum of three months per stay, but the stay may be extended once if necessary 

4. Extension of duration of stay in the Mainland: journalists stationed in Beijing in need of an extension may apply to the All-China’s Journalists Association; those stationed in other areas in need of an extension apply to respective local Taiwan Affairs Offices of the provinces, autonomous regions, and directly controlled municipalities and follow through with all relevant procedures. 

Relevant contact windows

1. Taiwan Businessmen Association

2. Straits Exchange Foundation 24-hour emergency hotline: 02-25339995

Notices for living in Mainland China

1. Mainland China’s weather overview 

2. Reminders of seeking medical attention:

a. There is a wide standard gap in terms of medical facilities and doctors in the Mainland, Taiwanese people in Mainland China, when seeking medical attention should choose hospitals of large scale or in urban areas; some provincial or city level hospitals in Mainland China have recently begun to offer “Taiwanese businessmen outpatient clinics”. 

b. Reimbursements for seeking medical attention in Mainland China: those insured under the National Health Insurance (NHI) program seeking medical attention in Mainland China due to unexpected injuries or illnesses, may apply for reimbursement with the regional divisions of the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in the location where the affiliation they are enrolled with on the day of outpatient or within six months following hospital discharge; applications made past the application deadline shall not be processed. All amounts shall be reimbursed against receipts; however, amounts shall be limited to the maximum value paid to a domestic Taiwanese medical center, which shall be announced on a quarterly basis. 

c. Health and epidemic prevention related affairs: for latest information concerning epidemics and infectious diseases on travels, please refer to the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control website, or dial the toll free epidemic reporting and consultation hotline at 1922 or the epidemic prevention hotline at 0800-001922.

d. Personal safety related affairs: when in the face of emergencies endangering personal safety such as illnesses, injuries, traffic accidents, or robberies, please firstly report to a local public security administration (Tel: 110) or call for an ambulance (Tel: 120) for assistance. You may also seek assistance from local tourism administrations and Taiwan Affairs Offices (city directory services: 114; long distance directory services: 116) or reach out to the SEF 24-hour emergency hotline (02-25339995)

II. Notices for Taiwanese Artists Performing in Mainland China

A. In prevention of foreign cultures’ potential influence on the Chinese people, Mainland China has set strict restrictions for foreign artists holding concerts and touring in the Mainland; venue conditions, songs to be included into the concert, capabilities of the organizers are all items required for review and approval, not to mention background checks on the performing artists. Private organizers of the concerts from the mainland may also have their own expectations for review and approval bottom lines, with which further restrict space for interpretation. Concerts and activities may also be cancelled without advanced warning depending on the political atmosphere and situation at the time. (For example, the annual plenary sessions of the National People’s Congress and the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, June 4th  Anniversary, and National Day Celebrations are all considered sensitive timing periods in Mainland China, and thus more strict and cautious review and approval procedures are applied to performances held then. )

B. Make sure the organizers are legally capable of holding such performances. (The Mainland specifically stated that only performing agencies with over two years experience in such performances or arts and culture performing groups are allowed to organize Taiwan related performances. For example, a Taiwanese artist once accepted an invitation from an ineligible company to perform, however was not paid after the performance and the organizer was nowhere to be found. 

C. Make sure the performance and events have been legally approved. (The Mainland states specifically that all performances must be legally approved by the government in advance, interim encore or performances past approved time periods are not allowed. A Taiwanese artist previously insisted on finishing his/her performance past set time schedule and was requested by the Mainland organizers to immediately stop singing on stage.)

D. Make sure the venue is legally approved. (If the performance venue has not been approved by the Chinese government, the performance itself cannot be officially promoted, and may be cancelled or requested to change locations. For example, a Taiwanese band once performed in an unauthorized venue (restaurant or Live House) and was reported and banned from future performances in the Mainland. 

E. Performance contract should include specific details. (To avoid future disputes, specific details should be set concerning performance content, payment, payment measures and conditions, security and maintenance of performing venue etc. For example, a Taiwanese artist performing in the Mainland was not paid the end payment, or was requested to attend additional events. 

F. Artists should secure an accident insurance. (For example, a Taiwanese artist was seriously injured due to a mishandling of equipment from the local staff in the Mainland and had to charter a plane home to Taiwan to be treated medically.)

Note: Taiwanese citizens when in the face of emergencies endangering personal safety, please reach out to the SEF 24-hour emergency hotline: +886225339995 (fee based)

III. Statistics concerning Mainland Chinese people in Taiwan for Culture and Education Exchanges

IV. Frequently Asked Questions concerning Cultural and Educational Affairs

A. Mainland China announced its 31 Measures towards Taiwan on February 28, 2018, in which included many opening up measures related to Taiwan’s culture, audiovisuals, and publications, what is the MAC’s view on this?

1. In response to the Mainland’s announcement of its opening up measures towards Taiwan’s culture, audiovisuals and publications, the Executive Yuan (EY) and the Minister of the competent authority, MOC, have publicly stated that, the problem still lies in that the Mainland has not loosened its grip on the approval system and in its ideology reviews. The EY and MOC both call on the Mainland to respect freedom of expression and creation so as to facilitate culture and creativity exchanges across the Strait. The MOC has proactively promoted policies such as increasing cultural production capabilities, enhancing investment and financing motivation, and establishing the Taiwan Creative Content Agency; it is hoped that such measures may strengthen Taiwan’s cultural competitiveness. 

2. Cross-strait cultural exchanges should be focused on sharing the core values of democracy, human rights, and rule of law in Taiwan, related exchanges should also conform with current policies and regulations. The Mainland side has long promoted similar opening-up measures towards Taiwan, but all with the same purpose of increasing the Mainland’s benefits to reach economic development goals and to absorbing Taiwan’s resources; the measures from the Mainland side are all aimed at getting the Taiwanese people to identify with their political position, it is merely a part of their overall Taiwan policy. 

3. The MAC would like to remind the Taiwanese people of the major differences in terms of system, regulations, film market environment and values between the two sides; it is strongly advised for the Taiwanese people to conduct comprehensive cost risk and impact assessments so as to protect one’s own rights, interests and safety. 

B. Mainland China recently announced its opening up measures to attract Taiwanese youths to study and work in the Mainland, what is the MAC’s view on this?

1. Cross-strait exchanges must not include political manipulations in order to facilitate benign exchanges and development across the Strait. The Mainland’s Taiwan policy has always included strong political intentions, its measures towards Taiwan are all with the same purpose of increasing the Mainland’s benefits to reach economic development goals and to absorbing Taiwan’s resources, technology and talents, and are all aimed at getting the Taiwanese people to identify with their political position. The MAC and all related authorities shall closely monitor their political intent and following developments. 

2. Major differences have long existed between the two sides in terms of politics, system, regulations, social development and living environment. The MAC and related authorities reminds the Taiwanese people to include the above-mentioned factors and potential risks into their overall assessment before going to the Mainland for studies and further development and also call on the people to adhere to the Cross-Strait Act and relevant regulations so as to protect one’s own rights, interests and safety.

C. What are the current regulations for Mainland movies, radio and television programs launched and broadcasted in Taiwan? 

1. According to the current “Regulations concerning Mainland movie, video, television and radio program productions brought into Taiwan, or launched, sold, produced, screened, broadcasted, exhibited and viewed in the Taiwan Area”, Mainland movies, radio and television programs must be reviewed and approved by the competent authority, the MOC Bureau of Audiovisual and Music Industry Development and with all Chinese subtitles converted to Traditional Chinese subtitles before being screened and broadcasted. 

2. All Mainland productions must also further abide by the “Regulations concerning the numbers, categories and hours Mainland movie and television program to be launched, screened and broadcasted in the Taiwan Area”. Currently ten categories of Mainland radio and television program are allowed to be screened and broadcasted in Taiwan, namely the a. technological, 2. Business management, 3. Nature, animal, ecological, 4. Geographical, 5. Cultural and arts, 6. Sports, 7. Language education, 8. Medical and sanitation, 9. Entertainment, and 10. Drama (including romance, family, comedy, history, mystery, martial arts, and motion films) categories. (Converted movies shall be approved by the MOC Bureau of Audiovisual and Music Industry Development in accordance to the abovementioned Regulation as to which Mainland movies may be screened in Taiwan.) 

3. As for the number Chinese movies allowed to be screened in Taiwan, the maximum is set at ten movies per year, with categories limited to romance, family, comedy, history, martial arts, mystery, and motion films. Furthermore, Chinese movies and radio and television programs to be screened in Taiwan through cable or broadcast television shall accord to the proportional restrictions stipulated in “Regulations for numbers, categories and hours of Mainland audiovisual programs to be launched, screened and broadcasted in the Taiwan Area” so as to protect Taiwanese local program productions. 

4. According to the “Regulations for numbers, categories and hours of Mainland audiovisual programs to be launched, screened and broadcasted in the Taiwan Area” amended and promulgated on October 30, 2014, Chinese movies awarded at the Cannes Film Festival, Venice Film Festival, Berlin International Film Festival, Academy Awards Ceremony (the Oscar), or Golden Horse Awards Ceremony are not limited to the quota of ten movies per year, and may apply to the MOC Bureau of Audiovisual and Music Industry Development to be screened in Taiwan. 

D. Are Chinese publications currently allowed into Taiwan? 

1. For Chinese publications entering Taiwan: according to “Regulations concerning Mainland movie, video, television and radio program productions brought into Taiwan, or launched, sold, produced, screened, broadcasted, exhibited and viewed in the Taiwan Area”, Chinese publications reviewed by the competent authority, the MOC, to not be in violation of Article 4 of the said Regulations, and do not exceed the quota announced by the MOC may enter Taiwan. 

2. Sale of Mainland books in Taiwan: the government has opened up for Chinese university level academic books, in simplified Chinese, to be sold in Taiwan starting in 2003, Related applications may be filed to the competent authority mandated publishers’ association (Publisher’s Association of the Republic of China中華民國圖書出版事業協會, CSBCA中華民國圖書發行協進會, and Association of Taipei Publishers臺北市出版商業同業公會) 

3. Issuance of Chinese magazines in Taiwan: the government has opened up for Chinese magazines to be sold in Taiwan in 2003; by mandating Taiwanese magazine companies, magazines under the four categories of “nature, animal and ecology”, “geography”, “arts and culture”, and “entertainment” may be issued in Taiwan upon conversion into traditional Chinese versions. 

E. When accepting Mainland Chinese journalist interviews, what should government authorities look out for? 

The competent authority, MOC, has established relevant notices for government agencies accepting Chinese journalist interviews, major points of concern as follows:

1. Upon request for interview from Chinese journalists, government agencies should make certain they have obtained a journalist license approved by the MOC, be sure the interview application is in accordance to the schedule approved by the Ministry of the Interior National Immigration Agency, check if interview is necessary or suits the operational affairs of the agency, and check if the journalist of the same media prior to the applicant conforms to all notice items established by the MOC (see link). 

2. Government agencies accepting Mainland Chinese interviews must be represented by the spokesperson or authorized personnel, and must send an interview record to both MOC and MAC for reference within seven days after the interview. 

3. After accepting Chinese journalists’ interviews, government agencies should request the journalist to provide a copy of the news report or news video for reference. Upon receiving the said copy of news report or video, they must be sent to the MOC and MAC for reference. 

For the MOC established “Notices for Government Agencies Accepting Mainland Journalists Interviews”, please click on below link: https://www.moc.gov.tw/information_422_80480.html

F. What are the government’s policies concerning the opening-up of Mainland Chinese journalists stationed in Taiwan?

1. With the goal of enhancing cross-strait media exchange, the government announced the opening-up of stationed Mainland journalists to Taiwan (on a rotation duration of one month per stay) in 2000 year-end so as to allow Mainland journalists a longer duration of stay to more thoroughly and truthfully observe and report on Taiwanese society. The government further increased the duration of stay for Mainland stationed journalists in Taiwan, on June 30, 2008, from one month to six months; streamlined their entry application procedures; and further opened-up for five more Mainland local medias to be stationed in Taiwan.

2. Furthermore, the number of journalists per media agency was increased to five as of October 27, 2009; an advanced notification requirement for Mainland stationed journalists to interview outside of their jurisdiction was eliminated; and Mainland journalists were allowed to make housing rentals through their inviting agencies as necessary. As of August 1, 2013, Mainland Chinese mass communication professionals (including Mainland journalists stationed in Taiwan) may be granted a multiple entry/exit permit within a one year period, as deemed necessary by the competent authority so as to give them more convenience in the course of their work. Also, starting January 1, 2014, according to stipulations stated in Section 1, Article 37 of the Rules Governing Permits for People in Mainland China Entering Taiwan, Chinese people applying for entry into Taiwan for professional exchange purposes (including Mainland journalists stationed in Taiwan) may also simultaneously apply for their spouses and minor children’s entry into Taiwan

G. Concerning the reciprocal flow of information across the Strait, what is the position of the MAC and the measures taken to facilitate it? 

1. Reciprocal communication and free flow of information is significant to exchange of news information across the Strait. We hope for Mainland China to stop blocking Taiwanese news websites and stop blocking our radio programs from be broadcasted through their radio frequency interference. 

2. In order to facilitate reciprocal communication of cross-strait information and assist better understanding between the people of the two sides, the government shall continue to promote cross-strait media exchanges, dedicate efforts in promoting Taiwan’s diverse information and development of free press over the Mainland side. The government shall also provide more convenience to the Mainland journalists stationed in Taiwan so as to better their experience in Taiwan’s environment of freedom of press and thus achieve reciprocal information exchange across the Strait. The MAC has long held cross-strait media exchange events such as interviews for Mainlanders in Taiwan, exchanges between graduate students majored in mass communication across the Strait, and cross-strait new media forums. Through these exchange activities, Mainland journalists, elites and young students will gain better understanding of Taiwan’s freedom of press and diverse media. 

H. What should Taiwanese artists be aware of when heading to the Mainland? Which channels should they turn to for assistance when encountering problems?

1. Taiwan is a free and diverse society where popular music and audiovisual production thrives with vitality and creativity. As contacts between the two sides of the Strait increase, these productions are also well-liked by the Chinese people, therefore attracting Taiwanese artists to further expand their career over to the Mainland side. However, the systems vary between the two sides, mindsets and habits also differ; Taiwanese artists, when performing in the Mainland, should fully communicate with the relevant organizing agencies and thoroughly understand relevant regulations and information in order to comprehensively protect one’s own rights and interests. 

2. The Mainland has established regulations concerning profiting performances for foreign artists performing in the Mainland Area, strict requirements and review procedures are in place regarding the organizing agencies, performance content, and venue, etc. Mainland China also announces various regulating documents as seen necessary to control and manage market order, such as the orders to cutback on entertainment programs (the original entertainment restriction order and its enhanced version.) 

3. Notices for Taiwanese artists performing in the Mainland:

a. In prevention of foreign cultures’ potential influence on the Chinese people, Mainland China has set strict restrictions for foreign artists holding concerts and touring in the Mainland; venue conditions, songs to be included into the concert, capabilities of the organizers are all items required for review and approval, not to mention background checks on the performing artists. Private organizers of the concerts may also have their own predictions on the review and approval bottom lines, with which further restrict space for interpretation. Concerts and activities may also be cancelled without advanced warning depending on the political atmosphere and situation at the time. (For example, the annual plenary sessions of the National People’s Congress and the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, June 4th Anniversary, and National Day Celebrations are all considered sensitive timing periods in Mainland China, and thus more strict and cautious review and approval procedures are applied to performances held then. )

b. Make sure the organizers are legally capable of holding such performances. (The Mainland specifically stated that only performing agencies with over two years’ experience in such performances or arts and culture performing groups are allowed to organize Taiwan related performances. For example, a Taiwanese artist once accepted an invitation from an ineligible company to perform, however was not paid after the performance and the organizer was nowhere to be found. 

c. Make sure the performance and events have been legally approved. (The Mainland states specifically that all performances must be legally approved by the government in advance, interim encore programs or performances past approved time periods are not allowed. A Taiwanese artist previously insisted on finishing his/her performance past set time schedule and was requested by the Mainland organizers to immediately stop singing on stage.)

d. Make sure the venue is legally approved. (If the performance venue has not been approved by the Chinese government, the performance itself cannot be officially promoted, and may be cancelled or requested to change locations. For example, a Taiwanese band once performed in an unauthorized venue (restaurant or Live House) and was reported and banned from future performances in the Mainland. 

e. Performance contract should include specific details. (To avoid future disputes, specific details should be set concerning performance content, payment, payment measures and conditions, security and maintenance of performing venue etc. For example, a Taiwanese artist performing in the Mainland was not paid the end payment, whereas another was requested to attend additional events. 

f. Artists should secure an accident insurance policy. (For example, a Taiwanese artist was seriously injured due to manual operation errors in the Mainland and had to charter a plane home to Taiwan to be treated medically.)

Note: Taiwanese citizens when in the face of emergencies endangering personal safety, please reach out to the SEF 24-hour emergency hotline: +886225339995 (fee based)

I. If Taiwanese artists or art groups performing in the Mainland were to encounter political intervention, what corresponding measures would the government take? 

1. Taiwanese artists and arts groups performing in Mainland China create friendly competition with Chinese artists, it also facilitates understanding between people of the two sides and enriches arts and cultural contents. We hope for Mainland China to respect the freedom to conduct arts and cultural performances and grant the artists and arts groups the creative development space necessary. It is hoped that all sectors may look at cross-strait cultural exchanges from a rational and peaceful perspective, and not bring political factors into exchange activities which may result in unnecessary complications to cross-strait relations. 

2. As for Taiwanese artists and arts group encountering difficulties in the Mainland, the MAC and competent authority (MOC) has always taken the issue seriously, and is dedicated to protecting the rights and interests of these Taiwanese artists and groups. The “Notices for Taiwanese Artists Performing in the Mainland” has been announced on the MAC website and distributed to all Taiwanese artists related associations. The government cares strongly for the personal safety and related rights and protections of artists performing in the Mainland, and hopes for all artists headed to perform in the Mainland may first thoroughly understand the differences between the system and society on the two sides. Taiwanese artists, when in the face of emergencies endangering personal safety, please reach out to the SEF 24-hour emergency hotline for assistance: +886225339995.

3. To increase Taiwanese audiovisual production and attract the returnee talents, the MOC has improved the capital, production, channel and environment factors, provided both subsidies/investments in assisting audiovisual production, promoted audiovisual content production guidance measures, enhanced self-made audiovisual programs, and expanded domestic demand and output into the international market. It is hoped that the audiovisual industry’s overall competitiveness may be increased, and a sound industry environment may be provided to audiovisual professionals. 

J. What is the government’s principle in dealing with cross-strait sports exchanges and principle to holding international sports competitions or events?

1. Cross-strait sports exchanges should adhere to the principles of reciprocity and dignity. Mainland Chinese people visiting Taiwan to participate in sports exchange events shall not intentionally alter any arrangements in our event venue concerning the layout of our national flag or Presidents’ portrait. 

2. Taiwan participates in all Olympic related international events under the designated “Olympic Model” agreed upon between the Chinese Taipei Olympic Committee and International Olympic Committee (IOC) (Taiwan participates in all IOC events under the name of “Chinese Taipei”). As for other international sports events or competitions not under the IOC system, Taiwan participates as according to related international organization regulations and seek to attend in our official national name and with our national flag anthem. 

3. The MOE Sports Administration has established the “Regulations Governing Cross-Strait Sports Exchange” and “Regulations Governing the Promotion and Subsidies of International Sports Exchange”, in which stipulate specifically the participating name, flag, anthem, and measures the Mainland may take to degrade Taiwan, and also explains in detail the application procedure. 

K. What is the government’s position on the promotion of cross-strait cultural exchange policy?

The government welcomes bilateral cultural exchange across the Strait. Taiwan develops cultural soft power through diversity and freedom, and cross-strait cultural exchange helps to pass on our cultural values of rich diversity and democracy; also, cultural exchange shall be conducted on the basis of equality, dignity, and mutual respect. Both sides should treasure and protect the fruits accumulated through cultural exchange over the years, allowing people on both sides of the Strait to communicate ideals and thoughts on equal ground and with dignity.

L. How to apply for exhibition of Chinese historic relics of the Mainland Area in Taiwan?

1. To apply for exhibition of Chinese historic relics of the Mainland Area in Taiwan, the applicant must be an agency, school, legal person, organization, or professional institution in Taiwan. In accordance with “Rules Governing the Granting of Permission for Importing Chinese Historic Relics of the Mainland Area into the Taiwan Area for public Display or Exhibition,” the applicant must submit application, proposal, invitation documents, contract, affidavit, list and information of the historic relics, compilation of the pictures of the historic relics, list of professional advisors and letters of consent, insuring agreement and insurance related documents, and list of escorts. The application must be submitted to the competent authority, the MOC, two months before the exhibition opens. 

2. The venue for the exhibition of historic relics in Taiwan as mentioned in the previous paragraph shall be cultural and educational institutions or schools that can provide the historic relics ideal display or preservation environment; the organizer shall not be engaged in selling or buying of the historic relics during the exhibition period; furthermore, all of the Chinese historic relics of the Mainland Area shall be exported out of the Taiwan Area after the public display or exhibition.

M. What is the government’s view on Taiwanese students considering studying in the Mainland Area?

1. Significant differences remain between both sides in the dimensions of politics, institutions, laws and regulations, and daily life. Taiwanese young students, before setting out for the Mainland, should first understand more about the Mainland Area and carry out careful assessment to protect one’s own rights. MAC has established a “Taiwanese Students Area” that collects related information and references of the Mainland’s domestic and foreign situations and the development of higher education, and young students are advised to visit the webpage. Compared to Mainland China, Taiwan’s higher education offers quality faculty members, academic freedom, and rich and diverse campus life, and young Taiwanese students should gather more information and weigh their options.

2. The government cares about and is concerned with learning and living of Taiwanese students in the Mainland Area. To enhance services and communication with Taiwanese students, the MAC has subsidized the SEF to be responsible for the tasks of maintaining contact with and providing services to Taiwanese students in the Mainland, launching the “Youth Care Hotline” (02-2175-7047) to offer a channel of professional services and advisory. When Taiwanese students have any questions or encounter emergencies in Mainland, they may reach out to the SEF for inquiry or assistance. In the future, the MAC will continue to take care of Taiwanese students in Mainland China.

N. How do Taiwanese students continue their education upon returning to Taiwan after studying in the Mainland Area?

1. For Taiwanese students, who have attended the three Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools in the Mainland registered with the MOE, returning to Taiwan to continue their education: The records and academic credentials of the three Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools in the Mainland are recognized by schools in the Taiwan Area. Students may bring documents that prove their student status (such as school record, report card, graduation certification, or certificate of incompletion) to national junior high schools and elementary schools in the area of their household registrations and apply to be accepted into appropriate grades. Documents required for returning to the Taiwan Area for compulsory education include: Household registry (or personal ID), parents’ stamps, certificate of graduation for graduated students, and all report cards and proof of transfer for students who are still in school. For students attending senior high schools, they must attend the schools in accordance to admission and transfer rules of senior high schools in the Taiwan Area. 

2. For Taiwanese students, who have attended local junior high schools or elementary schools in the Mainland Area, returning to Taiwan to continue their education:

(1) To attend national junior high schools and elementary schools: Students, who have attended local junior high schools or elementary schools in the Mainland Area and desire to attend national junior high schools or elementary schools upon returning to Taiwan shall submit documents proving their student status, which have been notarized by the Notary Office in the Mainland Area, verified by the SEF, and recognized by Department (Bureau) of Education of the municipalities or counties (cities) of their household registrations, to the national junior high schools and elementary schools in their areas, and be accepted into appropriate grades in accordance with the “Regulations Governing the Assessment and Recognition of Academic Credentials for Mainland Area” amended on April 30, 2013, and related regulations of Primary and Junior High School Act. 

(2) To attend senior high schools: Students, who have attended local schools (including international schools) in the Mainland Area, must provide academic records and credentials, which have been notarized by the Notary Office in the Mainland Area, verified by the SEF, and recognized by the Department (Bureau) of Education of the municipalities or counties (cities) of their household registrations, and be admitted by schools in accordance to admission and transfer rules of senior high schools in the Taiwan Area.

(3) To attend colleges or universities: Students should apply for universities or colleges following the diversified admission program. Students should provide academic records and credentials of senior high schools in the Mainland Area, which have been notarized by the Notary Office in the Mainland Area, verified by the SEF, and recognized by the Department (Bureau) of Education of the municipalities or counties (cities) of their household registrations. Grade 12 students, however, may provide only proof of senior high school student status in their applications.

(4) To attend graduate or doctoral programs: “Regulations Governing the Assessment and Recognition of Academic Credentials for Mainland Area” have lifted the restrictions on recognition of the academic credentials of some of the Mainland’s universities. Taiwanese students with academic credentials of higher education in the Mainland Area who comply with the aforementioned Regulations may apply for graduate schools or doctoral programs in Taiwan. Also, according to the Regulations, students attending universities in the Mainland Area between September 1992 and September 2000, had been previously required to pass qualifying examination and obtain certificate of equivalent educational level issued by the MOE; however, if Taiwanese people, who studied in Mainland’s universities during the aforementioned period, want to return to Taiwan to continue their education and study in graduate schools or doctoral programs,  and meet all the related requirement, they may apply for recognition of equivalent educational level of bachelor or master degree from the MOE with proof of admission after passing admission exams for graduate or doctoral programs held by universities in Taiwan; however, the proof of equivalent educational level can only be used for that particular school year. As for required documents of application for graduate and doctoral programs in Taiwan, enquire with the universities the applicants wish to apply to.

O. What is the “Get to Know Taiwan” Workshop organized by Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools in the Mainland with the assistance of the government?

1. For children of Taiwanese businessmen who have been staying in the Mainland Area for a long time to get to know Taiwan and maintain their emotional ties with Taiwan, the MAC has been subsidizing three Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools (Dongguan Taiwan Businessmen’s School, Huadong Taiwan Businessman’s School, and Shanghai Taiwanese Children’s School), to organize the “Get to Know Taiwan” Workshop during summer break since 2009, targeting children of Taiwanese businessmen in the Mainland Area who are not attending Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools.

2. The workshop focuses on Taiwan’s diversity, and fuses indigenous, Hakka, Holo(Taiwanese), and native cultures with local landscapes and customs of Taiwan to design classes of folklore and folkgame, sports, and group activities. With balanced curriculum of sedentary and active activities, the workshop aims to trigger students’ interest and motivation for learning and enhance the knowledge of the children of Taiwanese businessmen on Taiwan’s customs and culture, while allowing them to perceive the rich and diverse culture of Taiwan.

P. How has the government assisted the establishment of Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools in the Mainland Area?

1. To help children of Taiwanese businessmen in Mainland China to continue receiving education of Taiwan, the MOE and MAC have jointly formulated the “Regulations Regarding the Guidance and Establishment of Taiwanese Businessmen’s Schools in the Mainland Area” in accordance with Article 86 of the Private School Law, and provided guidance for the establishments of three Taiwanese businessmen’s schools in the Mainland Area (Dongguan Taiwan Businessmen’s School, Huadong Taiwan Businessman’s School, and Shanghai Taiwanese Children’s School). Students are children of Taiwanese businessmen in the Mainland Area, whereas teaching materials and faculty members are all from Taiwan, bridging with the education system in Taiwan. The academic system of kindergarten through to grade 12 allows students to continue their studies seamlessly upon returning to Taiwan.

2. The assistances provided by the MAC to Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools are: 1. Subsidize related funds of Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools to help the children and students to come back to Taiwan for seminars and inter-school exchange, as well as providing guidance to the students to return to Taiwan for supplementary education, in order to bridge children of Taiwanese businessmen in the Mainland Area with Taiwan’s education system, so that they can easily continue their education upon returning to Taiwan. 2. Help Taiwanese businessmen’s children schools organize Taiwan-themed activities to enhance learning content, strengthen emotional ties with Taiwanese businessmen and their children, improve Taiwanese businessmen’s children’s understanding of Taiwan’s history and culture, folk customs, and diverse social developments. 3. Help the SEF to organize summer camps in Taiwan for children of Taiwanese businessmen in the Mainland Area for the execution of the education policy of taking care of children of Taiwanese businessmen.

Q. What are the regulations governing the signing of MOU (or agreement) between cross-strait schools? Are there any important things to pay attention to?

1. According to the “Act Governing Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area,” Article 33-3: Any level of school of the Taiwan Area forming any coalition or engaging in any other cooperative activity of any written agreement with any school of the Mainland Area shall file with the Ministry of Education in advance. As stipulated in the article, Ministry of Education has formulated the “Guidelines for Reviewing any Coalition or Cooperative Activity of any Written Agreement Formed or Engaged in by any Level of School of the Taiwan Area with any School of the Mainland Area” to review such matters. The “written agreement (hereinafter referred to as the Written Agreement)” of any coalition or cooperative activity formed or engaged in by any level of school of the Taiwan Area with any school of the Mainland Area shall be filed with the MOE one month prior to the signing. Any level of schools under municipalities and counties (cities) shall file the Written Agreement with the MOE via respective competent educational administrative bodies.

2. The aforementioned Guidelines stipulate the filing procedure of schools of all levels, and clearly regulate that cross-strait inter-school cooperation shall not violate any laws and policies, exchange principles of equality and mutual benefit and security of top-secret technology, or social or national security.

R. What is the MAC’s position on the issue of health insurance coverage for students from the Mainland?

1. Based on humanitarian considerations and human rights values, Mainland Chinese students studying for academic degrees in Taiwan should be included in the health insurance system comparable to the treatment of foreign and overseas Chinese students. It has been the government's consistent position to allow all Mainland students studying in Taiwan to enjoy the same health coverage. On account of resource limitation and fairness of social insurance,  the overseas Chinese and international students should fully self-pay their insurance premium. However, the rights and benefits of those who came to Taiwan prior to the amendment of the act will not be affected. If any agencies have any policy considerations, and provide aids to any specific countries’ or students from poor families, these agencies must allocate own budgets for the aids. The National Health Insurance Act stipulates the insurance beneficiaries and calculation of premiums. Therefore, structurally, the act is under review and adjustment.

2. The draft amendments of the National Health Insurance Act have been reviewed by the Social Welfare and Environmental Hygiene Committee of the Legislative Yuan (December 19, 2016), and submitted for party negotiation (March 21, 2017). However, legislators of the ruling and opposition parties were unable to reach a consensus. The chairperson decided to detain the bill and entrust the president of the Legislative Yuan to convene negotiations. The Legislative Yuan included the draft amendments in the Third-Session discussions (April 28 and May 2, 2017), but it has not yet started substantive deliberation of the bill provisions.

3. The government's opening of recruitment of Mainland students to study in Taiwan has played an important role in promoting the diversification of education in Taiwan. During their time in Taiwan, Mainland students can experience Taiwan's multicultural development and share mainland China's experience. Promoting the inclusion of Mainland Chinese students in the National Health Insurance coverage reflects the government’s emphasis on the protection of the rights of Mainland Chinese students.

4. If Mainland Chinese students can be included in the health insurance coverage, their lives and learning are further protected here in Taiwan. Taking care of Mainland Chinese students in Taiwan, so that they enjoy friendly living and learning environments, is our shared vision, and the government hopes to garner broad support for the policy to include Mainland Chinese students in the health insurance system.

S. The government has lifted the restrictions for Mainland Chinese students to apply for technician skills test and serve as research or teaching assistants in schools. Can they also apply for Professional and Technical Examinations or hold a job in Taiwan?

1. According to Article 22 of the “Act Governing Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area,” currently, Mainland Chinese students cannot participate in professional and technical examinations in Taiwan, as these examinations are organized by Examination Yuan, and are fundamentally different than skills test organized by Ministry of Labor; also, according to Article 15 and Article 18 of the “Regulations Governing the Enrollment of People from the Mainland Area in Taiwanese Colleges and Above,” Mainland Chinese students are prohibited to work part-time jobs during their time studying in Taiwan and must leave Taiwan upon graduation. Therefore, Mainland Chinese students will not affect Taiwanese people’s employment.

2. The government has lifted the restrictions on Mainland Chinese students’ participating in technical skills test as a measure of learning assessment, and employment of Mainland Chinese students in Taiwan remains prohibited; Mainland Chinese students can work as research or teaching assistants within the scopes of their field of studies (must be part of the class or thesis research, or requirement of graduation, which must applies to all students).

T. What are the government’s purposes and supporting measures for allowing Mainland Chinese students to study in Taiwan?

1. The government's opening of recruitment of Mainland students to study in Taiwan has played an important role in promoting the diversification of education in Taiwan. Through exchange and learning, young students from both sides of the Strait improve and progress through competition. Not only does it enhance Taiwanese students’ competitiveness and broaden their horizons, during their time in Taiwan, Mainland students can experience Taiwan's multicultural development and share Mainland China's experience, enhancing the mutual understanding of students across the Strait, which will help to achieve long-term peace and stability for cross-strait relations.

2. The competent authority, the MOE, has formulated the “Regulations Regarding the People of the Mainland Area to Study in Taiwanese Institutions of Higher Education,” which governs all matters relating to Mainland students’ studying in Taiwan. Based on the principles of “phased implementation, review and amendment, and comprehensive measures,” and under the premise of protecting the rights and benefits of Taiwanese students, the government reviews and amends related measures of Mainland Chinese students’ studying in Taiwan, including progressively liberalizing recognition of academic qualifications of colleges and universities in Mainland China (the MOE announced on April 27, 2016, “List of Recognized Higher Education Institutions in Mainland China,” recognizing 155 colleges and universities and 191 junior colleges in the Mainland Area), allowing Mainland Chinese college graduates to attend 2-year bachelor programs in Taiwan, increasing enrollment quotas for Mainland students, permitting Mainland students to participate in technical skills test, and allowing Mainland students to work as research assistants and teaching assistants related to their fields of study. The government has also streamlined entry and exit procedures for Mainland students studying in Taiwan, in order to provide friendly living and learning environments, hoping that more young Mainland Chinese students can have the opportunity to come to Taiwan to learn and compete with Taiwanese students.

U. Why does the government recognize academic qualifications of Mainland China’s higher education? What is the scope of recognition?

1. The government liberalizes recognition of Mainland China’s higher education academic qualifications to keep pace with the trends of globalization, diversification, and opening up of higher education, and help Taiwanese students who have obtained higher education academic qualifications in Mainland China to return to Taiwan to continue their education or work. These will help to bridge Taiwan’s higher education with the world and enhance Taiwan’s competitiveness, while also helping the excellent Taiwanese students to return to Taiwan and attracting talents to Taiwan.

2. Currently, the MOE recognizes 155 colleges and universities and 191 junior colleges. The government will uphold the principles of “phased implementation, review and amendment, and comprehensive measures,” to evaluate further liberalization of recognition of higher education academic qualifications of Mainland China.

V. What is MAC’s position on cross-strait youth exchange? Are there projects launched by MAC?

1. The government welcomes normal and orderly cross-strait exchanges between young students, which help to increase mutual understanding and facilitate peace and stability in cross-strait relations. The MAC believes that cross-strait youth exchange should focus on sharing Taiwan’s experience of development and promote Taiwan’s ideals and core values of democracy, diversity, human rights, and rule of law, while complying with existing policies and laws and regulations.

2. To facilitate in-depth cross-strait youth interaction, the MAC has organized “Exploration of Taiwan’s Diverse Culture Workshop,” “Cross-Strait Young Students Civic Consciousness and Media Literacy Workshop,” “Cross-Strait Law Students Forum,” and “Cross-Strait Mass Communication Graduate Students Forum.” The MAC has supported all sectors to continue promoting exchange activities that facilitate cross-strait youth interaction, under the premises of complying with current exchange policy and laws and regulations, in order to share with Mainland Chinese youths Taiwan’s experience and ideal of diverse social development.

W. Does the government offer any subsidies or rewards for cross-strait cultural and educational exchanges?

Cross-strait cultural and educational exchange will facilitate mutual understanding of the people on both sides, achieving exchange of experience and mutual benefits, and facilitating prosperity on both sides of the Strait. To encourage the private sector to organize cross-strait exchange activities, the MAC has formulated the “Regulations Governing MAC Subsidy for Organization of Cross-Strait Private Exchange Activities.” Other central agencies have also formulated related subsidy regulations, which are listed below:

Name of Agency Related Guidelines for Subsidy or Reward
Ministry of Education (MOE) Regulations Governing MOE Subsidy for Organization of Cross-Strait (including Hong Kong and Macau) Academic and Educational Exchange Activities
Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST)

• Regulations Governing the Recruitment of Visiting Science and Technology Personnel with Subsidies from the Ministry of Science and Technology

• Regulations Governing the Invitation of Science and Technology Personnel for Short-term Visit in Taiwan with Subsidies from the Ministry of Science and Technology

• Regulations Governing the Organization of Cross-Strait Science and Technology Academic Seminars with Subsidies from the Ministry of Science and Technology

Ministry of Culture (MOC)

• Regulations Governing the Touring of Domestic Classical Works of Performing Art in Mainland with Subsidies from Ministry of Culture

• Regulations Governing Cultural Organizations or Individuals Visiting Overseas or the Mainland Area and Hong Kong and Macau for Cultural Exchange Events with Subsidies from Ministry of Culture

• Regulations Governing Private Organizations Organizing Cross-Strait Communication or Journalism Exchange Events with Subsidies from Ministry of Culture

• Regulations Governing Visual Arts Industry’s Organization of or Participation in International Art Exhibitions and Fairs with Subsidies from Ministry of Culture

Sports Administration, MOE

• Regulations Governing Subsidizing Group Funds for Private National Sports Events

• Regulations Governing the Promotion and Subsidization of International Sports Exchange Events

X. How do private organizations apply to invite Mainland Chinese cultural and educational professionals to Taiwan for exchange?

The inviting organizations must comply with “Rules Governing Permits for People in Mainland China Entering Taiwan” to prepare all required documents and materials, and apply online on the “Online Application for Mainland Chinese Visiting Taiwan for Professional Exchange,” a subsystem of Ministry of the Interior National Immigration Agency’s “Online Application and Certificate Issuance Management System for Short-term Visitors in Taiwan from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macau.”

Y. What are the rules and regulations for going to Mainland China for cultural and educational exchange events?

Currently, all citizens can visit Mainland China to participate in cultural and educational exchange activities, including academic, educational, cultural, religious, art, or sports, lectures, interviews, speeches, meetings, exhibitions, and competitions. All activities that may jeopardize national security or interests are strictly prohibited during stay in Mainland China; when in case of a civil servant, he or she must comply with “Regulations Governing Public Servants and Special Status Personnel from the Taiwan Area Entering the Mainland Area” and “Regulations Governing Public Servants under the Tenth Grade and Police Officers under the Fourth Rank not Involved in Top Secrets of National Security from the Taiwan Area Entering the Mainland Area.”

Z. Regarding the 31 Taiwan-related measures announced by Mainland China, which encourage Taiwanese scholars and researchers of science and technology to apply for Mainland’s national funds in order to attract Taiwan’s technologies and talents. What are the views of the MAC on this?

1. Mainland China announced the 31 Taiwan-related measures on February 28, 2018, among which, 15 measures allow Taiwanese people to apply for national funds or projects in order to attract Taiwan’s talents of science and technology to participate in Mainland’s research activities. At the “Strengthening Taiwan, Tackling Challenges without Hesitation” Press Conference held on March 16, 2018, Executive Yuan clearly pointed out that the various Mainland Chinese national funds and key research programs were official endeavors, and the Taiwanese people who currently work in public and private scientific research institutes and all universities, were prohibited to participate without permissions. Also, the MOST has launched various actions in response to related policies in aim to enhance rewards for academic and research talents and attract talents to return to Taiwan.

2. According to Article 33 of the “Act Governing Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area,” any individual, juristic person, organization, or other institution of the Taiwan Area shall not hold any position or become any member of the agencies, institutions or organizations of the Mainland Area which are political parties, the military, the administration or of any political nature; Article 90 of the Act also stipulates related punishments. Regarding the issue of Taiwanese nationals applying funds for related research projects of the Mainland Area, whether they have violated the aforementioned Articles by holding any position or become any member of the agencies, institutions or organizations of the Mainland Area, shall be determined on a case-by-case basis by competent authorities. The government reminds Taiwanese nationals to carefully assess potential risks and pay attention to the Act Governing Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area, as well as related regulations.