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Mainland Affairs Council

Mainland Chinese Students in Taiwan

Promotion of Facilitation Measures for Mainland Students Studying and Living in Taiwan

1. The government is progressively liberalizing recognition of academic qualifications from colleges and universities in mainland China based on the principle of the importance of teaching quality. It also continues to simplify screening operations for recognizing academic qualifications:

(1) The government began to allow Mainland students to study in Taiwan in 2011. At the time, the Ministry of Education (MOE) recognized only 41 of the Mainland colleges and universities under Project 985. Since then, restrictions on recognition of academic qualifications from mainland China have been relaxed under the principle of progressive liberalization. The MOE currently recognizes academic qualifications from 155 colleges and universities and 191 junior colleges, for a total of 346 schools.

(2) In October 2016, the MOE amended the Operating Guidelines for Examination of Academic Qualifications from Universities in the Mainland Area. From 2017, the process of examining doctorate-level academic qualifications has been streamlined comparable to the 2015 graduate-level procedure, with "thesis review and oral examination" replacing the existing "written test and thesis review" method.

 

2. Enrollment quotas for Mainland students will be gradually relaxed, giving consideration to school resource allocation and abiding the principle of protecting the education rights of Taiwanese students:

Article 4 of the Regulations Regarding the People of the Mainland Area to Study in Taiwanese Institutions of Higher Education stipulates that the quota for Mainland student enrollment may not exceed 1% of total national enrollment (about 2,850 students). On April 30, 2013, the MOE increased the limit on Mainland student enrollment to 2% of total national enrollment.

 

3. The law continues to limits recognition of medical academic qualifications from mainland China. Mainland students are still unable to apply for civil servant examinations and professional and technical examinations;however, they are allowed to participate in technical skills certification under the principle of separation of license and permission:

(1) Paragraph 1, Article 22 of the Act Governing Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area (hereinafter the "Cross-Strait Act") stipulates that academic qualifications from colleges and universities in mainland China related to medical personnel defined under the Medical Care Act cannot be recognized. Moreover, the MOE and Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) do not yet allow recognition of medical academic qualifications related to medical personnel in the categories of teaching, examination, and practice.

(2) Paragraph 2, Article 22 of the Cross-Strait Act stipulates that mainland Chinese people without household registrations in the Taiwan are not eligible to participate in civil servant examinations or professional and technical examinations. However, technician skills certification do not fall under this restriction and are according to the separation of license and permission. The Council of Labor Affairs (currently the Ministry of Labor) issued a letter of interpretation on March 14, 2013, announcing that applications would be open to Mainland students from July 1, 2013.

 

4. Enrollment quota for Mainland students is supplementary and unrelated to the preferential scoring system

The enrollment quota for Mainland students is currently supplemental and does not affect domestic enrollment quotas. Moreover, the preferential scoring system is not adopted in the enrollment application system for Mainland students.

 

5. Central government agencies do not provide grants for Mainland students. However, grants funded by local governments or schools are exempt from this restriction:

Under Paragraph 2, Article 14 of the Regulations Regarding the People of the Mainland Area to Study in Taiwanese Institutions of Higher Education, central government agencies and their subordinate organs may not budget funds to provide grants for Mainland students. Furthermore, schools are not allowed to use the central government subsidies for scholarships or grants to Mainland students. However, this restriction does not apply to funding from local governments or schools.

 

6. Overall policy does not allow Chinese mainlanders to work in Taiwan. Mainland students can not stay or work in Taiwan after graduation, nor can they work part-time during their studies. However, they may serve as "research assistants" and "teaching assistants" related to their field of study:

(1) Under Article 15 of the Regulations Regarding the People of the Mainland Area to Study in Taiwanese Institutions of Higher Education, Mainland students can not engage in full-time or part-time work in Taiwan. However, the MOE explained in a January 22, 2014, decree that the aforementioned work excludes work related to one's field of study (e.g. internships) and service learning (e.g. volunteering). Mainland students can therefore serve as "research assistants" and "teaching assistants" related to their field of study and engage in service learning to improve social welfare.

(2) Article 18 of the Regulations Regarding the People of the Mainland Area to Study in Taiwanese Institutions of Higher Education stipulates that Mainland students must leave the country within one month after graduation. Furthermore, Article 11 and Article 95 of the Cross-Strait Act stipulate that Chinese mainlanders are not allowed to work in Taiwan.

 

7. Facilitation measures for Mainland students studying and living in Taiwan:

(1) Change of status: Mainland students who, during their period of study, change the status of their stay or residency in Taiwan must withdraw from school (e.g. if they marry a Taiwanese person, they must choose the status of Mainland student or Mainland spouse). However, the government now allows Mainland students who change the status of their stay or residency in Taiwan during their period of study to continue studying in Taiwan (meaning there will be no impact from changing status to Mainland spouse). (Effective from December 2014)

(2) Streamlined entry and exit procedures: (Effective from December 2014)

1. Renewal of "multiple-entry visas" comparable to treatment of foreign students

2. Visa renewal applications can be arranged by schools or individually by Mainland students.

3. Simplified documentation for visa extension applications

(3) Greater learning diversity: (Effective from December 2014)

1. Mainland students are allowed to transfer to earlier grades.

2. Mainland students are allowed to directly study for a doctorate.

3. Rules requiring the reporting of Mainland student tuition and fees to the MOE for reference have been canceled, consistent with the treatment of foreign students.

(4) Post-graduation employment assistance: (Effective from 2014 May】

1. In response to employment problems faced by Mainland students after graduating from studies in Taiwan, the University Entrance Committee for Mainland Chinese Students has created a recruitment platform for Taiwan enterprises on its website. The Straits Exchange Foundation (SEF) assists in introducing Mainland graduates to Taiwanese companies and providing employment and recruitment information.

2. The SEF has also partnered with Taiwan businesses to establish an information platform app and jointly holds related job fairs with the Republic of China Association of Private Universities and Colleges (e.g. the 2017 Elite Job Fair for Taiwan Company in the Mainland) to provide recruitment information to Taiwan companies and help Mainland students find employment in the Mainland after graduation.

(5) Simplification of proof of academic qualifications: Procedures for recognizing academic qualifications for graduates of higher education institutions in mainland China have been simplified. For example, notarization and verification procedures are only required if there are doubts during the verification process. (Effective from November 2012)

(6) Simplification of admission documents: Proof of financial ability issued by a financial institution only requires notarization and verification if there are doubts over the documentation. (Effective from July 2012)

(7) Car purchase: Mainland students with an entry and exit permit valid for at least six months, a driver license, and a school certificate of attendance may register a vehicle. (Effective from February 2012)

(8) Facilitation of family visits: The spouses and relatives to the second-degree of consanguinity of Mainland students studying in Taiwan (including undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students) can apply to make family-related visits to Taiwan. (Effective from December 2011) Under the principle of "phased implementation, review and amendment, and complete supporting measures" and consistent with humanitarian considerations, restrictions will be progressively relaxed based on the needs of Mainland students.

 

8. Promoting the inclusion of Mainland students in the National Health Insurance system:

(1) Since the new administration came into office, the MAC has on various occasions expressed hope that mainland Chinese students can be included in the National Health Insurance system comparable to the treatment of foreign and overseas Chinese students. It has also presented reports to the Legislative Yuan, DPP caucus, and party members to win support. In addition, the MAC has promoted supporting bills and measures related to the inclusion of mainland Chinese students in the national health insurance system, as well as communicated and discussed this matter on several occasions with the MOHW, MOE, Overseas Community Affairs Council, and other ministries and departments.

(2) On October 24, 2016, a presidential spokesman explained to the public that, "Based on humanitarian considerations and human rights values, mainland Chinese students should be included in the health insurance system comparable to the treatment of foreign and overseas Chinese students. Due to limited government resources and in consideration of the fairness of social insurance, Mainland, overseas Chinese, and foreign students should all self-pay their health insurance premium. However, the rights and interests of overseas Chinese and foreign students studying in Taiwan prior to the amendment will not be affected. Agencies that, for policy considerations, provide assistance for students from specific countries or low-income families should independently provision budget to fund such programs."

(3) On November 3, 2016, Premier Lin Chuan convened an "administrative legislation coordination meeting" that resolved to ask the governing party caucus to propose amendments to the National Health Insurance Act. On November 7, 2016, the ruling party caucus proposed draft amendment to the Act by resolution of the Legislative Yuan meeting on November 11. The draft was submitted to the Social Welfare and Environmental Hygiene Committee of the Legislative Yuan for review.

(4) On December 7, 2016, the Social Welfare and Environmental Hygiene Committee of the Legislative Yuan reviewed the draft amendment to the National Health Insurance Act submitted by the DPP caucus and People First Party (PFP) caucus. It resolved to ". . . continue to periodically review the entire case."

(5) On December 19, 2016, the Social Welfare and Environmental Hygiene Committee of the Legislative Yuan continued to review the draft amendment to the National Health Insurance Act submitted by the DPP and PFP caucuses. After discussions with legislators at the meeting, the committee tentatively completed the review. The chairman instructed that the proposals of each party and the motions for correction and supplementary resolutions of members be cleared out of the committee. However, this required prior consultations among the ruling and opposition caucuses.

(6) On March 21, 2017, the Social Welfare and Environmental Hygiene Committee of the Legislative Yuan held party consultations on the draft amendment to the National Health Insurance Act. However, legislators of the ruling and opposition parties were unable to reach a consensus. The chair decided to retain the bill and entrust the Legislative Yuan President to hold negotiations. On April 28 and May 2, 2017, the Legislative Yuan included the bill for discussion. However, substantive consideration the bill provisions has not yet commenced.